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Tax Man

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Tax his land, tax his wage,

Tax his bed in which he lays.

Tax his tractor, tax his mule,

Teach him taxes is the rule.

Tax his cow, tax his goat,

Tax his pants, tax his coat.

Tax his ties, tax his shirts,

Tax his work, tax his dirt.

Tax his tobacco, tax his drink,

Tax him if he tries to think.

Tax his booze, tax his beers,

If he cries, tax his tears.

Tax his bills, tax his gas,

Tax his notes, tax his cash.

Tax him good and let him know

That after taxes, he has no dough.

If he hollers, tax him more,

Tax him until he’s good and sore.

Tax his coffin, tax his grave,

Tax the sod in which he lays.

Put these words upon his tomb,

“Taxes drove me to my doom!”

And when he’s gone, we won’t relax,

We’ll still be after the inheritance TAX,

Hey maybe you’ll get a refund!!

Accounts Receivable Tax

Building Permit Tax

CDL license Tax

Cigarette Tax

Corporate Income Tax

Dog License Tax

Federal Income Tax

Federal Unemployment Tax (FUTA)

Fishing License Tax

Food License Tax

Fuel permit tax Gasoline Tax (42 cents per gallon)

Hunting License Tax

Inheritance Tax Interest expense (tax on the money)

Inventory tax

IRS Interest Charges (tax on top of tax)

IRS Penalties (tax on top of tax)

Liquor Tax

Luxury Taxes

Marriage License Tax

Medicare Tax

Property Tax

Real Estate Tax

Service charge taxes

Social Security Tax

Road usage taxes (Truckers)

Sales Taxes

Recreational Vehicle Tax

School Tax

State Income Tax

State Unemployment Tax (SUTA)

Telephone federal excise tax

Telephone federal universal service fee tax

Telephone federal, state and local surcharge taxes

Telephone minimum usage surcharge tax

Telephone recurring and non-recurring charges tax

Telephone state and local tax

Telephone usage charge tax

Utility Taxes

Vehicle License Registration Tax

Vehicle Sales Tax

Watercraft registration Tax

Well Permit Tax

Workers Compensation Tax

 

COMMENTS: Not one of these taxes existed 100 years ago and our nation was the most prosperous in the world, had absolutely no national debt, had the largest middle class in the world and Mom stayed home to raise the kids.

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April 2, 2009 Posted by | Government Sucks, Sad | | 3 Comments

With all due respect Mr. President, that is not true.

 

“Few challenges facing America and the world are more urgent than combating climate change.The science is beyond dispute and the facts are clear.”

— PRESIDENT-ELECT BARACK OBAMA, NOVEMBER 19 , 2008

With all due respect Mr. President, that is not true.

We, the undersigned scientists, maintain that the case for alarm regarding climate change is grossly overstated. Surface temperature changes over the past century have been episodic and modest and there has been no net global warming for over a decade now.1,2 After controlling for population growth and property values, there has been no increase in damages from severe weather-related events.3 The computer models forecasting rapid temperature change abjectly fail to explain recent climate behavior.4 Mr. President, your characterization of the scientific facts regarding climate change and the degree of certainty informing the scientific debate is simply incorrect.

 

  • Syun Akasofu, Ph.D, University Of Alaska
  • Arthur G. Anderson, Ph.D, Director Of Research, IBM (retired)
  • Charles R. Anderson, Ph.D, Anderson Materials Evaluation
  • J. Scott Armstrong, Ph.D, University Of Pennsylvania
  • Robert Ashworth, Clearstack LLC
  • Ismail Baht, Ph.D, University Of Kashmir
  • Colin Barton Csiro, (retired)
  • David J. Bellamy, OBE, The British Natural Association
  • John Blaylock, Los Alamos National Laboratory (retired)
  • Edward F. Blick, Ph.D, University Of Oklahoma (emeritus)
  • Sonja Boehmer-Christiansen, Ph.D, University Of Hull
  • Bob Breck Ams, Broadcaster Of The Year 2008
  • John Brignell, University Of Southampton (emeritus)
  • Mark Campbell, Ph.D, U.S. Naval Academy
  • Robert M. Carter, Ph.D, James Cook University
  • Ian Clark, Ph.D, Professor, Earth Sciences University Of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada
  • Roger Cohen, Ph.D, Fellow, American Physical Society
  • Paul Copper, Ph.D, Laurentian University (emeritus)
  • Piers Corbyn, MS, Weather Action
  • Richard S. Courtney, Ph.D, Reviewer, Intergovernmental Panel On Climate Change
  • Uberto Crescenti, Ph.D, Past-President, Italian Geological Society
  • Susan Crockford, Ph.D, University Of Victoria
  • Joseph S. D’aleo, Fellow, American Meteorological Society
  • James Demeo, Ph.D, University Of Kansas (retired)
  • David Deming, Ph.D, University Of Oklahoma
  • Diane Douglas, Ph.D, Paleoclimatologist
  • David Douglass, Ph.D, University Of Rochester
  • Robert H. Essenhigh, E.G. Bailey Emeritus, Professor Of Energy Conversion, The Ohio State University
  • Christopher Essex, Ph.D, University Of Western Ontario
  • John Ferguson, Ph.D, University Of Newcastle
  • Upon Tyne, (retired)
  • Eduardo Ferreyra, Argentinian Foundation For A Scientific Ecology
  • Michael Fox, Ph.D, American Nuclear Society
  • Gordon Fulks, Ph.D, Gordon Fulks And Associates
  • Lee Gerhard, Ph.D, State Geologist, Kansas (retired)
  • Gerhard Gerlich, Ph.D, Technische Universitat Braunschweig
  • Ivar Giaever, Ph.D, Nobel Laureate, Physics
  • Albrecht Glatzle, Ph.D, Scientific Director, Inttas (Paraguay)
  • Wayne Goodfellow, Ph.D, University Of Ottawa
  • James Goodridge, California State Climatologist, (retired)
  • Laurence Gould, Ph.D, University Of Hartford
  • Vincent Gray, Ph.D, New Zealand Climate Coalition
  • William M. Gray, Ph.D, Colorado State University
  • Kenneth E. Green, D.Env., American Enterprise Institute
  • Kesten Green, Ph.D, Monash University
  • Will Happer, Ph.D, Princeton University
  • Howard C. Hayden, Ph.D, University Of Connecticut, (emeritus)
  • Ben Herman, Ph.D, University Of Arizona, (emeritus)
  • Martin Hertzberg, Ph.D, U.S. Navy, (retired)
  • Doug Hoffman, Ph.D, Author, The Resilient Earth
  • Bernd Huettner, Ph.D.
  • Ole Humlum, Ph.D, University Of Oslo
  • A. Neil Hutton, Past President, Canadian Society Of Petroleum Geologists
  • Craig D. Idso, Ph.D, Center For The Study Of Carbon Dioxide And Global Change
  • Sherwood B. Idso, Ph.D, U.S. Department Of Agriculture (retired)
  • Kiminori Itoh, Ph.D, Yokohama National University
  • Steve Japar, Ph.D, Reviewer, Intergovernmental Panel On Climate Change
  • Sten Kaijser, Ph.D, Uppsala University, (emeritus)
  • Wibjorn Karlen, Ph.D, University Of Stockholm, (emeritus)
  • Joel Kauffman, Ph.D, University Of The Sciences, Philadelphia, (emeritus)
  • David Kear, Ph.D, Former Director-General, Nz Dept. Scientific And Industrial Research
  • Richard Keen, Ph.D, University Of Colorado
  • Dr. Kelvin Kemm, Ph.D, Lifetime Achievers Award, National Science And Technology Forum, South Africa
  • Madhav Khandekar, Ph.D, Former Editor, Climate Research
  • Robert S. Knox, Ph.D, University Of Rochester (emeritus)
  • James P. Koermer, Ph.D, Plymouth State University
  • Gerhard Kramm, Ph.D, University Of Alaska Fairbanks
  • Wayne Kraus, Ph.D, Kraus Consulting
  • Olav M. Kvalheim, Ph.D, Univ. Of Bergen
  • Roar Larson, Ph.D, Norwegian University Of Science And Technology
  • James F. Lea, Ph.D.
  • Douglas Leahy, Ph.D, Meteorologist
  • Peter R. Leavitt, Certified Consulting Meteorologist
  • David R. Legates, Ph.D, University of Delaware
  • Richard S. Lindzen, Ph.D, Massachusetts Institute Of Technology
  • Harry F. Lins, Ph.D. Co-Chair, IPCC Hydrology and Water Resources Working Group
  • Anthony R. Lupo, Ph.D, University Of Missouri
  • Howard Maccabee, Ph.D, MD Clinical Faculty, Stanford Medical School
  • Horst Malberg, Ph.D, Free University of Berlin
  • Bjorn Malmgren, Ph.D, Goteburg University (emeritus)
  • Jennifer Marohasy, Ph.D, Australian Environment Foundation
  • James A Marusek, U.S. Navy, (retired)
  • Ross Mckitrick, Ph.D, University Of Guelph
  • Patrick J. Michaels, Ph.D, University Of Virginia
  • Timmothy R. Minnich, MS, Minnich And Scotto, Inc.
  • Asmunn Moene, Ph.D, Former Head, Forecasting Center, Meteorological Institute, Norway
  • Michael Monce, Ph.D, Connecticut College
  • Dick Morgan, Ph.D, Exeter University, (emeritus)
  • Nils-axel Morner, Ph.D, Stockholm University, (emeritus)
  • David Nowell, D.I.C., Former Chairman, Nato Meteorology Canada
  • Cliff Ollier, D.Sc., University Of Western Australia
  • Garth W. Paltridge, Ph.D, University Of Tasmania
  • Alfred Peckarek, Ph.D, St. Cloud State University
  • Dr. Robert A. Perkins, P.E. University Of Alaska
  • Ian Pilmer, Ph.D, University Of Melbourne (emeritus)
  • Brian R. Pratt, Ph.D, University Of Saskatchewan
  • John Reinhard, Ph.D, Ore Pharmaceuticals
  • Peter Ridd, Ph.D, James Cook University
  • Curt Rose, Ph.D, Bishop’s University (emeritus)
  • Peter Salonius, M.Sc., Canadian Forest Service
  • Gary Sharp, Ph.D, Center For Climate/Ocean Resources Study
  • Thomas P. Sheahan, Ph.D, Western Technologies, Inc.
  • Alan Simmons, Author, The Resilient Earth
  • Roy N. Spencer, Ph.D, University Of Alabama-Huntsville
  • Arlin Super, Ph.D, Retired Research Meteorologist, U.S. Dept. Of Reclamation
  • George H. Taylor, MS, Applied Climate Services
  • Eduardo P. Tonni, Ph.D, Museo De La Plata, (Argentina)
  • Ralf D. Tscheuschner, Ph.D.
  • Dr. Anton Uriarte, Ph.D, Universidad Del Pais Vasco
  • Brian Valentine, Ph.D, U.S. Department Of Energy
  • Gosta Walin, Ph.D, University Of Gothenburg, (emeritus)
  • Gerd-Rainer Weber, Ph.D, Reviewer, Intergovernmenal Panel On Climate Change
  • Forese-Carlo Wezel, Ph.D, Urbino University
  • Edward T. Wimberley, Ph.D, Florida Gulf Coast University
  • Miklos Zagoni, Ph.D, Reviewer, Intergovernmental Panel On Climate Change
  • Antonio Zichichi, Ph.D, President, World Federation Of Scientists

Footnotes

  1. Swanson, K.L., and A. A. Tsonis. Geophysical Research Letters, in press: DOI:10.1029/2008GL037022.
  2. Brohan, P., et al. Journal of Geophysical Research, 2006: DOI: 10.1029/2005JD006548. Updates at http://www.cru.uea.ac.uk/cru/data/temperature.
  3. Pielke, R. A. Jr., et al. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 2005: DOI: 10.1175/BAMS-86-10-1481.
  4. Douglass, D. H., et al. International Journal of Climatology, 2007: DOI: 10.1002/joc.1651.

April 2, 2009 Posted by | Government Sucks | , | Leave a comment

545 People Responsible for America’s Woes

The Declaration of Independence – 1776
The Articles of Confederation – 1777
The Constitution for the United States – 1787
Its Sources and Its Application

 545 People Responsible for America’s Woes by Charley Reese

Have you ever wondered why, if both the Democrats and the Republicans are against deficits, we have deficits? Have you ever wondered why, if all the politicians are against inflation and high taxes, we have inflation and high taxes?

You and I don’t propose a federal budget. The president does. You and I don’t have the Constitutional authority to vote on appropriations. The House of Representatives does. You and I don’t write the tax code. Congress does. You and I don’t set fiscal policy. Congress does. You and I don’t control monetary policy. The Federal Reserve Bank does.

One hundred senators, 435 congressmen, one president and nine Supreme Court justices – 545 human beings out of the 300 million – are directly, legally, morally and individually responsible for the domestic problems that plague this country.

I excluded the members of the Federal Reserve Board because that problem was created by the Congress. In 1913, Congress delegated its Constitutional duty to provide a sound currency to a federally chartered but private central bank.

I excluded all the special interests and lobbyists for a sound reason They have no legal authority. They have no ability to coerce a senator, a congressman or a president to do one cotton- picking thing. I don’t care if they offer a politician $1 million dollars in cash. The politician has the power to accept or reject it.

No matter what the lobbyist promises, it is the legislator’s responsibility to determine how he votes.

A CONFIDENCE CONSPIRACY

Those 545 human beings spend much of their energy convincing you that what they did is not their fault. They cooperate in this common con regardless of party.

What separates a politician from a normal human being is an excessive amount of gall. No normal human being would have the gall of a SPEAKER, who stood up and criticized G.W. Bush ALONE for creating deficits.

The president can only propose a budget. He cannot force the Congress to accept it. The Constitution, which is the supreme law of the land, gives sole responsibility to the House of Representatives for originating and approving appropriations and taxes.

Who is the speaker of the House? She is the leader of the majority party. She and fellow Democrats, not the president, can approve any budget they want. If the president vetoes it, they can pass it over his veto.

REPLACE THE SCOUNDRELS

It seems inconceivable to me that a nation of 300 million cannot replace 545 people who stand convicted — by present facts – of incompetence and irresponsibility. (and all should be convicted of dereliction of duty as defined by their oath of office, and in some cases outright treason.)

I can’t think of a single domestic problem, from an unfair tax code to defense overruns, that is not traceable directly to those 545 people

When you fully grasp the plain truth that 545 people exercise power of the federal government, then it must follow that what exists is what they want to exist.

If the tax code is unfair, it’s because they want it unfair. If the budget is in the red, it’s because they want it in the red. If the Marines are in IRAQ, it’s because they want them in IRAQ.

There are no insoluble government problems. Do not let these 545 people shift the blame to bureaucrats, whom they hire and whose jobs they can abolish; to lobbyists, whose gifts and advice they can reject; to regulators, to whom they give the power to regulate and from whom they can take this power.

Above all, do not let them con you into the belief that there exist disembodied mystical forces like “the economy,” “inflation” or “politics” that prevent them from doing what they take an oath to do.

Those 545 people, and they alone, are responsible. They, and they alone, have the power. They, and they alone, should be held accountable by the people who are their bosses – provided the voters have the gumption to manage their own employees. We should vote all of them out of office and clean up their mess.   The election is not that far away!

March 20, 2009 Posted by | Interesting to me | , | 4 Comments

Greed: The Top 1%

The Wall Street Journal has a piece titled The Obama Rosetta Stone which is an interesting read. Find there a graph titled “Top One Percent of Earners Have Been Increasing Their Share” which shows an ever increasing percentage of “total income” greedily stolen by the top 1% from the hides of the downtrodden masses.

The WSJ takes the angle of discrediting the chart with a combination of ad hominem and ridicule. Whatever you think about that chart, as I think little of it, it lays out a marker that the Obama Administration will be using for the next 4 years (gah! maybe 8 [sob]). Lucky for us, there is a very clear rebuttal to this chart.

Mark J Perry’s post has it in an eerily familiar looking shape…

 

 

Here is the key data point: While the “share of income” going to the top 1% has risen to around 23%, the share of the tax burden on the top 1% has risen to almost 40%.

This data ends in 2006, I wonder what these lines will look like when President Obama’s “soak the rich” tax plan goes into effect. I’m fairly certain that it will not be pretty.

March 19, 2009 Posted by | Assinine, Sad | | Leave a comment

Postal Service draws criticism for $1.2 million home buy

Need to raise the price of stamps. Cut back a delivery day to save money

 

LAKE WATEREE, South Carolina (CNN) — At a time when the U.S. Postal Service says it is experiencing a financial crisis, it purchased a $1.2 million home from an employee so he could relocate, a CNN investigation has found.

The Postal Service bought this 8,400-square-foot South Carolina home so an employee could relocate.

The Postal Service bought this 8,400-square-foot South Carolina home so an employee could relocate.

Postal Service spokesman Greg Frey said the home will be resold, as others have been.

“It’s not like we threw away a million dollars,” Frey told CNN. “We are hoping it’s going to go for the appraised value.”

But a real estate agent in the area said the home could be a tough sell in a depressed housing market — and the USPS said it lost an average of more than $58,000 on the 500-plus homes its relocation program bought and sold in 2008.

The 8,400-square-foot, six-bedroom home on Lake Wateree, about 30 miles north of Columbia, is likely to be the last million-dollar home purchased by the Postal Service. A $1 million cap on homes eligible for the relocation program took effect in February, Frey said.

But the program has raised eyebrows among critics and is under scrutiny by the USPS inspector-general’s office in the wake of a CNN investigation.

The South Carolina home belonged to Ronald Hopson, the former postmaster in Lexington, South Carolina, and his wife, Evelyn. The property includes five acres, four bathrooms, two half-baths and an indoor swimming pool. Video Watch a tour of luxurious home »

Hopson is now the customer service manager for the USPS branch in Carrollton, Texas. He would not discuss the house and referred CNN to the service’s press office for additional questions. But property records show that the house was purchased by the Postal Service’s relocation contractor, Connecticut-based Cartus Relocation, in February.

Just weeks earlier, Postmaster General John Potter told a congressional subcommittee that the post office was considering cutting back mail delivery because of the economy.

“The Postal Service, like the rest of the economy, is experiencing a severe financial crisis, and I’m here today to ask for your help to protect America’s postal system,” Potter said.

He added that the post office has cut travel expenses and frozen executive salaries.

Faced with those cutbacks, Billie Bierer — who owns the lot next door to Hopson’s old home — called the purchase “crazy.”

“I mean, this should not be allowed in any company, and in this economy, things need to change,” Bierer said.

The Postal Service is a semipublic corporation, chartered by the U.S. government but not supported by taxpayer funds. Corporate relocation services are a common executive perk in the corporate world, where companies typically buy a property from an employee who is transferring to another city and resell it later.

Some U.S. government agencies do the same thing, but with limits on how much they will spend. For example, the Food and Drug Administration limits its relocation assistance to homes under $330,000.

Frey said the average cost of the 1,022 homes purchased through the USPS relocation program in 2007 and 2008 was $257,874. Fifteen of those remain on the market, he said.

Of the 1,022, 14 cost between $1 million and $2.8 million. All of those have been sold, Frey said, but typically at a loss once closing costs, attorneys fees and commissions are paid.

In 2007, after the U.S. housing boom peaked, the USPS lost an average of $50,542 on each deal, he said. In 2008, with the market in full retreat, the average loss climbed to $58,397.

And in Lake Wateree, real estate agent David Beckroge said, buyers for million-dollar properties are hard to come by right now.

“That would be very tough,” he said.

The purchase of Hopson’s home drew criticism from Pete Sepp, vice president of the National Taxpayers Union, a Washington-based government watchdog group.

“At a time when the Postal Service is considering cutting back on delivery, raising stamp prices, perhaps even going to the federal government for a taxpayer bailout, this sends the wrong signal. It is likely to make customers very angry,” Sepp said.

And Sen. Chuck Grassley, who has been a critic of the Postal Service relocation policy, has asked Postal Service Inspector-General David Williams to investigate the deal. A spokesman for Williams’ office said it was conducting a preliminary review of the case.

“We need to know that the Postal Service is for the patrons of the Postal Service, the people that are buying stamps, the people that are supporting it, that they’re getting their money’s worth,” said Grassley, R-Iowa

March 14, 2009 Posted by | Government Sucks | , , | Leave a comment

That’s it in a nutshell

Who’s Listening?
A cowboy named Bud was overseeing his herd in a remote mountainous pasture in California when suddenly a brand-new BMW advanced out of a dust cloud towards him. The driver, a young man in a Brioni suit, Gucci shoes, RayBan sunglasses and YSL tie, leans out the window and asks the cowboy, “If I tell you exactly how many cows and calves you have in your herd, Will you give me a calf?”
Bud looks at the man, obviously a yuppie, then looks at his peacefully grazing herd and calmly answers, “Sure, Why not?”
The yuppie parks his car, whips out his Dell notebook computer, connects it to his Cingular RAZR V3 cell phone, and surfs to a NASA page on the Internet, where he calls up a GPS satellite to get an exact fix on his location which he then feeds to another NASA satellite that scans the area in an ultra-high-resolution photo.
The young man then opens the digital photo in Adobe Photoshop and exports it to an image processing facility in Hamburg , Germany Within seconds, he receives an email on his Palm Pilot that the image has been processed and the data stored. He then accesses an MS-SQL database through an ODBC connected Excel spreadsheet with email on his Blackberry and, after a few minutes, receives a response.
Finally, he prints out a full-color, 150-page report on his hi-tech, miniaturized HP LaserJet printer and finally turns to the cowboy and says, “You have exactly 1,586 cows and calves.”
“That’s right. Well, I guess you can take one of my calves,” says Bud.
He watches the young man select one of the animals and looks on amused as the young man stuffs it into the trunk of his car.
Then the Bud says to the young man, “Hey, if I can tell you exactly what your business is, will you give me back my calf?”
The young man thinks about it for a second and then says, “Okay, why not?”

“You’re a Congressman for the U.S. Government”, says Bud.
“Wow! That’s correct,” says the yuppie,
“No guessing required.” answered the cowboy.
“You showed up here even though nobody called you; you want to get paid for an answer I already knew, to a question I never asked. You tried to show me how much smarter than me you are; and you don’t know a thing about cows… this is a herd of sheep….
Now give me back my dog.”

March 13, 2009 Posted by | Funny | | 1 Comment

I’m voting Democrat

I’m voting Democrat

I’m voting Democrat because English has no place being the official language in America.

I’m voting Democrat because it’s better to turn corn into fuel than it is to eat.

I’m voting Democrat because I’d rather pay $4 for a gallon of gas than allow drilling for oil off the coasts of America.

I’m voting Democrat because I think the government will do a better job of spending my money than I could.

I’m voting Democrat because when we pull out of Afghanistan and Iraq , I know the Islamic terrorists will stop trying to kill us because they’ll think we’re a good and decent country.

I’m voting Democrat because I believe people who can’t tell us if it will rain in two or three days, can now tell us the polar ice caps will disappear in ten years if I don’t start riding a bicycle, build a windmill or inflate my tires to proper levels.

I’m voting Democrat because it’s alright to kill millions of babies as long as we keep violent, convicted murderers on death row alive.

I’m voting Democrat because I believe businesses in America should not be allowed to make profits. Businesses should just break even and give the rest to the government so politicians and bureaucrats can redistribute the money the way they think it should be redistributed.

I’m voting Democrat because I believe guns, and not the people misusing them, are the cause of crimes and killings.

I’m voting Democrat because when someone with a weapon threatens my family or me, I know the government can respond faster through a call to 911 than I can with a gun in my hand.

I’m voting Democrat because oil companies’ 5% profit on a gallon of gas are obscene, but government taxes of 40% to 60% on the same gallon of gas are just fine.

I’m voting Democrat because I believe three or four elitist liberals should rewrite the Constitution every few months to suit some fringe element that could never get their agenda past voters.

I’m voting Democrat because illegal aliens are not criminals, are not sucking up resources through government aid, hospital services, education, or social services, but are just people trying to make a better life by coming to America illegally. We can’t blame them for that, can we?

I’m voting Democrat because now I can now marry whatever I want, so I’ve decided to marry my goat.

February 27, 2009 Posted by | Government Facts | | Leave a comment